16
Jan

Seven Tips for Practicing Positive Discipline

It’s the ultimate do-as-I-say-and-not-as-I-do parenting moment: your preschooler throws a fit because there are blueberries in her pancake—and she didn’t want blueberries in her pancake!—and, in an effort to control her tantrum, you counter with your own: “Stop yelling now!”

You have just entered into a disciplinary arms race in which there are no winners—only hurt feelings, sore throats and soaring blood pressure. But parenting doesn’t have to be a battle. Proponents of positive discipline teach that kids can—and will—behave without threats, bribes, yelling and physicality. Here are seven tips that will set you on the path to better behavior—and a stronger, more peaceful connection with your child.

  1. Understand the meaning behind the behavior. Naomi Aldort, the author of “Raising Our Children, Raising Ourselves,” says that children want to behave well; if they seem to miss the mark, it’s not without a valid reason. “The most important [thing] is to realize that whatever a child does, we may label as bad, [but really] the child is doing the best he can. It’s our job as parents to find out why [he is] doing it,” says Aldort. “Once we know the valid root of the behavior, we can easily remove the cause or heal the emotions, and the child won’t be driven to behave in that way anymore.”

    So ask yourself: is your child hitting her sibling in a desperate bid for your attention? Maybe you stayed on the phone too long or ignored her as you rushed to get dinner on the table. If so, what correction can you make to your own behavior that will satisfy your child’s need? “A lot of what we expect of children is unreasonable,” says Aldort.

  2. Focus on controlling yourself—not your child. It’s hard to keep cool in the heat of the moment, but Dr. Katharine C. Kersey, the author of “The 101s: A Guide to Positive Discipline,” says that parents need to model the types of behavior they want their children to emulate. Remember, yelling begets yelling, hitting begets hitting. ” We should not do anything in front of [our children] that we don’t want them to do,” she advises. In the case of an extreme behavioral flare-up, this may mean counting to 10, taking a deep breath or simply walking away until you’ve had time to collect yourself.

    Jim Fay, the founder of the organization Love and Logic, agrees. “Anger and frustration feed misbehavior,” he says. Fay offers an unusual tactic for keeping your voice in check: instead of yelling that your child is doing something wrong, try singing it. Fay teaches parents what he calls the “Uh Oh” song. If a child throws a toy after he’s been asked to stop, you might sing, “Uh Oh, that’s sad you threw your truck again. I think it’s time the truck went away.”

  3. Be consistent with your expectations. Aldort says that parents often overlook a certain behavior in the hope that it will pass. “But guess what?” she says. “It doesn’t pass.” If your child bites another child, for instance, you should hold her arm and tell her that the behavior is not acceptable. If she continues, then it is time to remove her from the situation.

    Sometimes a child might try to test the limits by arguing with the rules. When this happens, Fay suggests neutralizing negotiations by repeating one simple mantra as often as necessary: “I love you too much to argue.”

  4. Give attention to the behavior you like—not the behavior you don’t. Children often act up because they want your attention, so sometimes it pays to ignore those actions you don’t want to see more of. Kersey calls this the “Rain on the grass, not on the weeds” principle. Tantrums and whining? Play deaf or walk away, and your child will quickly learn that there’s a better way to communicate.
  5. Redirect, redirect, redirect. Kids who hear “No” or “Don’t” all the time tend to tune those directives out. So instead of telling your child what not to do, Kersey recommends instead offering a positive behavior to replace the misbehavior. For instance, a child acting up at the grocery store could be enlisted to help pick out oranges or rearrange the items in a grocery cart, or a kid running around a swimming pool might be challenged to walk “as if on marshmallows.”
  6. Exploit the “energy drain.” Any parent who’s been in the trenches knows how tiring it is when a child acts up—but did you know that that fatigue can be used to your advantage? Fay calls this the “energy drain” principle. For instance, you might defuse a sibling confrontation by saying, “Wow, you need to take that fight with your brother somewhere else, because listening to that could cause me a big energy drain, and I don’t think I’ll have the energy to take you to the park after dinner.”
  7. Don’t bribe. It may be tempting to offer your child a cookie for behaving well during an outing, but Fay warns against it. Offering a child a reward sends the wrong message; what kids hear is “‘You don’t want to be very good and you have to be paid off,'” says Fay.

    Instead, Fay says, “the best reward for a kid is time with the parents.” Kersey agrees that quality time is key to a happy, well-behaved child. She recommends that each parent spend at least 15 minutes one-on-one connecting with a child every day. “Do something your child wants to do [during that time],” says Kersey. “Whisper in their ear how wonderful they are, how much you love them. … It’s the best investment you can make in your child.”

16
Jan

how you communicated to your child (preeschool age 3-5)

 

Mom: Would you like to hide under the kitchen table? Boy: Yes!

Solve Problems Playfully

“Preschoolers love to play and three minutes of play can save you ten minutes of struggle. If your preschooler refuses to leave, a question like, ‘Would you like to hide under the table so no one sees you escape?’ turns a potential battle into a game. It’s a lot more fun for both of you — and actually can save time!”

Gillian McNamee, Ph.D.

Director of Teacher Education, Erikson Institute

How You Communicate

Give your preschooler your full attention. Even a quick but focused connection may fill your child’s need for communication. If she says “Play with me,” and you are not available, you might explain why or say, “I had a hard day at work today. I need three minutes to change. Then I can play with you.” Preschoolers can understand your feelings — to a point — and will appreciate your honesty.

Be aware of your tone. Because preschoolers are new to sentence-making themselves, they may have a heightened awareness of your tone and body language.

Reflect your child’s unspoken emotions. This helps put your child’s feelings into words. If she didn’t get a turn at the playground, you might say, “You wanted to play with the ball next, didn’t you?” or “Boy are you mad!”

Enlist your preschooler’s help in figuring out a problem. For example, you might say, “Did something in that movie scare you?” If your child doesn’t answer, you might follow up by saying, “Could it have been the look on that character’s face?”

Help your preschooler develop emotional awareness. Even if there is misbehavior — you can talk about it together. Most preschoolers can understand a sentence like “Sometimes, I get mad too. It helps me to go into another room and take some deep breaths.”

Offer limited choices. Preschoolers gain a sense of control by making their own decisions. You might say, “Do you want to get dressed before or after breakfast today?”

Don’t end your sentence with “OK?” unless you are ready for your child to say “No.” Asking your child if an activity is OK can lead to a lengthy discussion and even a power struggle.

Grant a preschooler’s wish in fantasy. If your child expresses sadness that a toy has to be shared, you might say, “Would you like it if you had the toy all to yourself? What would you do with it?” By expressing a wish and talking it through, even if it can’t be granted, a child begins to calm down.

Create safe opportunities for preschoolers to express their BIG feelings. For example, if your child is extremely angry, instead of saying, “Stop yelling,” you might say, “Go in the bathroom and scream as loud as you can for one minute.”

Don’t over-explain. Simple explanations may be more effective than long discussions. If your preschooler is having a tantrum, holding her close — or just staying nearby — may mean more than any words you can say.

16
Jan

how they communicated (preeschool age 3-5)

 

Mom: Time to go to school. Boy: No!. Mom: Do you want to play another minute, then go?

Preschoolers Need to Say “No”

“For a preschooler sometimes ‘no’ is not meant to start a power struggle, it’s simply an expression of self. ‘NO let me do it alone. No, I do it.’ It’s important to remember that your child may simply be doing his job growing up, and saying ‘yes’ to himself, rather than ‘no’ to you.”

Susanna Neumann, Ph.D.

Child Psychoanalyst

How They Communicate

Between ages two and three, many preschoolers begin to use more complicated sentences. However, this does not mean that they understand all of an adult’s words or abstract concepts. In fact, preschoolers are often very literal thinkers and interpret ideas concretely. Many are only beginning to think logically and understand sequences of events.

Preschoolers learn that they can use specific words to say what they mean. They have long known their parents’ words have power over their lives and they are beginning to realize that their own words can make a difference as well. They create more powerful meanings using their growing vocabulary.

“No” and “Why” become common words for young preschoolers. Saying “No” is a way a preschooler claims her space. Saying “Why” is a wish to understand the world around her. “Why” is also a word preschoolers use to question authority. Underneath the question, they are saying “Why do you have power over me when I want to feel autonomous?”

Preschoolers like to participate in decisions. This gives them a feeling of control and independence. A preschooler might think, “I can take a different position from my mother — and I like it.” Or, “By saying what I want, I am a big kid.”

Preschoolers love to imitate other people’s words. They often mimic comments, phrases and sophisticated statements. At times they misuse or exaggerate phrases, particularly during pretend play. A preschooler might say to a doll, “You are so bad you are going to jail for 100 years!”

Preschoolers like to hear about and describe the same event over and over. By telling and listening to stories, preschoolers begin to form opinions about the world and how they fit into it. They say “tell me again,” because hearing a story many times makes them feel safe and secure. When the story is repeated, it also allows them to imagine new scenarios.

Preschoolers like to make up their own explanations. This helps them make sense of things they are only beginning to understand. For example, a preschooler might explain her sadness about winter being over by saying, “When the snow melts, the winter is crying.” Preschoolers may also embellish stories with wishful thinking.

Between three and five, preschoolers refine their understanding of cause and effect. Older preschoolers can understand simple explanations of cause and effect such as “The medicine will help you get well” and “If you eat healthy food, you will grow big and strong.”

Preschoolers also talk through their bodies, their play and their art. In fact, verbal communication still may not be the dominant way many preschoolers either understand the world or express themselves.

15
Jan

how you communicated to babies age 0-2

 

Mom: Ohh ah ah ohh. Baby Ohh ... oh ah.

Play a Sound Game

“Babies learn to communicate not only through the words you say, but by what you do, how you hold and touch them and respond to their needs. If you hear your baby make a sound like ‘Oh,’ you might echo and extend it with an ‘Oh, ah, oh.’ Soon you will be having a back-and-forth game of sound.”

Gillian McNamee, Ph.D.

Director of Teacher Education, Erikson Institute

How You Communicate

Touch, cuddle and croon to babies as a first form of communication. When babies cry, you can reassure them with your presence and a comforting, soothing tone. Babies respond the emotions you are communicating through what they see, hear and feel. They react to your sadness, tension, happiness or satisfaction.

Be aware that tone and body language make a difference. When a baby hears “Stop!” he will sometimes cry, because he is reacting to the sharpness and volume of your command. In the same way, a soft, loving “Good night” when you are tucking him into bed will comfort your child because of the soothing tone.

Stay physically connected as a way to communicate. Babies like being close to their parents. Wearing or holding them next to your body communicates reassurance and comfort; a carrier also allows you to move around and carry on with your life.

Don’t be surprised if your baby cries when you are on the phone. A baby knows when you are not paying attention, and he knows how to get that attention back. His wailing can come at inconvenient times, but being aware of what’s causing your baby’s reactions may help you stay patient and deal with him in the moment.

Turn baby talk into a two-way conversation. Invite responses from your baby. Singing and chanting nursery rhymes are good ways to play with sound. They invite your baby to make a pleasing stream of sounds that eventually lead to talking.

Extend sounds and words to help children develop language skills. If your toddler says “Go home,” you might extend his thought by saying, “You want to go home. We can leave in a few minutes.”

Even if you are not sure how much your child understands, talk anyway! Like holding and kissing, words are an important way of staying in contact with your baby. They will help your baby begin to attach feelings and thoughts to sounds.

15
Jan

how they comunicated (babies age 0-2)

Mom: Are you showing Mama your spoon. Baby: Mammammamma.

Babies Play With Sound

“Babies and toddlers may use the same word (often Mama or Dada) to indicate wanting different things such as food, comfort and play! They may also use this word with different intentions to express upset as well as excitement.”

Gillian McNamee, Ph.D.

Director of Teacher Education, Erikson Institute

How They Communicate

Crying is one of a baby’s first ways of communicating through sound. By the time a baby is four weeks old, her cries are differentiated. There is a unique cry for hunger, wetness, pain and missing companionship. Within a few months, babies also start to coo and gurgle with pleasure.

Within three to four months, babies realize that when they make noise, people respond. When a parent or caregiver responds to a baby’s cries, the baby begins to trust her means of communication, because her needs are being met. In the second six months of life, babies begin to babble in the language of their parents and other caregivers.

Babies and toddlers do not understand words out of context. Instead, they understand words in combination with your gestures, tone and facial expression.

By 18-24 months, toddlers begin to use action words. These words express what they see or want, leaving out adjectives and other grammatical conventions. They may come out with short phrases such as “Mommy go,” or “Shoes on.” Babies and toddlers also speak through gestures and tone of voice. What they do physically may be as important as what they actually say.

Toddlers use words and short sentences to assert themselves. “No” and “mine” are used to claim space and take control of their new world. It is developmentally important for a toddler to say these words. When young children say “No” to parents, they are often saying “Yes” to themselves. Asserting their independence is an early, important step towards becoming their own person, separate from you.

15
Jan

getting problem solved

When your child has a problem at school, it is important for your family and the school to work together. Contact your child’s teacher early, when the problem is just beginning. It is common for parents to wait until they are upset about an issue before making this contact. But, if child has been frustrated for too long it becomes harder to work together for a solution.

These steps will help you make the most of your communication with your child’s teacher about any problem:

  1. Think about the problem in terms of home and school. What is happening at home? What is your concern about school?
  2. What are possible ways of solving the problem at school and at home? Try to think of more that one solution.
  3. Talk about the problem and your ideas for solving it with your child’s teacher.
  4. Keep your emotions under control. Angry parents are threatening to teachers. Anger can hurt your effort to help your child.
  5. Talk about what you, your child or the teacher will need to do to help.
  6. Take action.
  7. Talk with your child about the problem and any changes.
  8. Follow up with the teacher to talk about how the problem was solved. If the problem doesn’t improve, discuss a new plan. Talk with the teacher about who else could help solve the problem.
  9. Most importantly, keep working on your child’s behalf until the problem is solved.

Teachers aren’t the only help available

Many people are available in our schools and communities to help parents get solutions to the issues children and families face. The resources are different in each school and community. The school or district office can give you phone numbers for the support people in your schools. If you need help for your child, you can contact:

  • Guidance counselors;
  • School nurses;
  • School social workers;
  • School psychologists;
  • Parent mentors for special education;
  • Parent liaisons;
  • PTO/PTA presidents;
  • Principals;
  • School board members;
  • Transportation directors;
  • School nutritionists;
  • Special education directors;
  • Literacy (reading) specialists;
  • Curriculum coordinators;
  • Religious leaders;
  • Scouts, boys and girls clubs, and 4H leaders;
  • Coaches and trainers.
15
Jan

children and media (milestone age 5)

How children use media has a lot to do with who they are. Although no two kids are exactly alike, children generally go through the same stages of development. Knowing these stages can help you encourage your child to use media in new and creative ways.

5 year old girl

Your 5 year old says…

  • I enjoy making up and telling stories. I know that a story has a beginning, middle and end.

    What you can do: When you and your child are watching a video, turn it into a storytelling game. After a character in the show does something important, or right before the ending, turn off the program and ask your child to guess what will happen next. Once your child has made up her version, resume watching, pointing out what was different or the same.

  • I like to make up games with simple rules.

    What you can do: Try to pick computer games that allow your child to set the rules or that have an “explore mode” that lets your child experiment. Before your child begins to play, check the settings of the game to see what’s possible — sometimes there is a “Parents” button.

  • I can be afraid of loud noises, the dark, animals and some people.

    What you can do: Avoid TV shows that your child may find frightening–especially right before bedtime. If she becomes scared, reassure her that everyone is safe. A hug and a favorite toy may bring comfort.

  • When I’m mad or jealous, sometimes I start to hit.

    What you can do: When your child has a strong emotional response, help her cope by supplying words that she can use. You might say, “I can see you are angry that we had to turn off the TV to get ready to leave,” and “You probably feel sad that your drawing on the computer got erased.” Also, try to avoid TV programs, books and video games that depict characters resolving conflict with physical violence.

  • I like to move my body.

    What you can do: In addition to setting limits on the amount of time your child watches TV and plays on the computer, get her moving, skipping, running, balancing, throwing, climbing, jumping rope, galloping, hopping and dancing.

  • I understand rules. I try to ask if it’s okay before I do something.

    What you can do: Let your child know when it is and is not okay to watch TV and use the computer. Try to be consistent and avoid introducing what may seem to be new rules in the middle of a disagreement with your child.

  • I sometimes need to get away and be by myself.

    What you can do: Your child may need some down time, especially when first adjusting to preschool. Instead of using the TV as a way to let your child zone out, find other quiet activities, like drawing or listening to soothing music.

  • I can understand who the people around me are, like brother, sister or grandmother. I also know that other families may be the same or different from mine.

    What you can do: Choose TV shows and software that introduce your child to people with different backgrounds. Help your child understand that not all families look the same. Encourage respect for others by introducing her to a variety of dolls, foods, programs and songs.

  • Choose TV shows and software that introduce your child to people with different backgrounds. Help your child understand that not all families look the same. Encourage respect for others by introducing her to a variety of dolls, foods, programs and songs.

    What you can do: When she’s watching TV or playing on the computer, encourage your child to use a pencil and paper to copy letters and numbers that she sees. Also, point out characters and scenes that she can draw or paint.

  • I know some colors and can use words like “small,” “smaller” and “smallest.” I also can sort things by size, and I can make groups.

    What you can do: Select TV shows and computer activities that give your child a chance to sort, group, match, count and create sequences. Help her put away books, videos and other toys according to categories. For example, “Let’s first put away all of the books about animals.”

  • I like to argue and try to make sense of things. I like to use the word “because.”

    What you can do: After watching a TV show, ask your child “what if” questions, like “What if D.W. was older than her brother Arthur?”

  • I am interested in how one thing can make another thing happen.

    What you can do: Choose TV programs, computer activities and books that introduce your child to cause and effect and show her how things work. Look for take-apart and put-together activities, games that use mechanical objects and sequences where one event leads to another.

  • I’m starting to understand what is right and wrong.

    What you can do: Talk to your child about why a TV character does something and what makes that character’s behavior right or wrong.

15
Jan

children and media (milestone age 4)

How children use media has a lot to do with who they are. Although no two kids are exactly alike, children generally go through the same stages of development. Knowing these stages can help you encourage your child to use media in new and creative ways.

4 year old girl

Your 4 year old says…

  • I’ve learned that, on most days, my family does the same things in the same order.

    What you can do: Help your child understand where TV watching fits — and doesn’t fit—into your family’s daily and weekly routines. Try to be consistent.

  • I understand when something is taller, bigger, the same, more, on, in, under and above. I can count out loud (but not always in the right order) and can name some colors and shapes.

    What you can do: Read software reviews and TV program guides to find activities that teach important number and space concepts, like counting, arranging objects from biggest to smallest, or describing something as near or far. Reinforce these concepts when you and your child are talking.

  • I enjoy singing simple songs and rhymes and using words that don’t make sense.

    What you can do: Choose TV programs and computer activities that include songs and rhythms. Encourage your child to sing and dance rather than just watch.

  • I can be afraid of the dark and monsters.

    What you can do: Avoid TV shows that may be scary for your child, especially right before bedtime. If she becomes scared, reassure her that everyone is safe. A hug and a favorite toy may bring comfort. But remember, what scares one child may not scare a sibling or a peer.

  • I love to tell jokes, although they may not make much sense to you.

    What you can do: Though some TV programs work on two levels – one that appeals to children and one that appeals to adults – other shows are designed solely for kids, and may offer you little entertainment. Still, pay attention to what makes your child giggle and encourage joke telling.

  • I have lots of energy. I can ride a tricycle, jump five to six inches in the air, run, hop, catch a ball and turn somersaults.

    What you can do: In addition to setting limits on the amount of time your child watches TV and plays on the computer, get her moving, crawling, running, balancing, throwing, climbing, bouncing, galloping, hopping and dancing.

  • I pay attention to what girls, like mommies and sisters, do and what boys, like daddies and brothers, do.

    What you can do: Avoid TV shows with gender stereotypes that teach your child that an activity is “just for boys” or “just for girls.” Tell your child that both girls and boys can be anything they want to be.

  • I have a big imagination. Sometimes I don’t know what’s real and what’s made-up.

    What you can do: When you ask your child to tell you stories — even those about something on TV, from a book or in a computer game — anticipate that her stories may be wild and exaggerated. Try not to discourage your child from telling her version of a story.

  • I understand and follow simple rules (most of the time).

    What you can do: Clearly tell your child what the TV and computer rules are. For example, you might let your child know that “all screens go off when we eat.” Be consistent.

  • I like to talk and carry on elaborate conversations. I ask and answer who, what, when, why and where questions.

    What you can do: Turn TV watching into an activity. Ask your child questions about programs and characters and give him chances to build on TV stories by drawing pictures. Provide crayons and paper and offer to write captions on your child’s drawings.

  • I can feel lots of anger and frustration – usually I know how to use my words instead of my fists.

    What you can do: Avoid TV programs and computer games that show characters resolving conflict with physical violence. When your child sees a character use physical violence to solve a problem, point it out as something not to do and offer suggestions. For example, “Instead of hitting the mouse, he could have asked him to stop bothering him.”

  • I have a big imagination and sometimes I have make-believe playmates. I love pretending to be other people and things.

    What you can do: Help your child incorporate many characters – even those from TV, video games and books — into dramatic play. Provide props like old clothes, egg cartons and large cardboard boxes that can expand your child’s play.

15
Jan

children and media (milestone age 3)

How children use media has a lot to do with who they are. Although no two kids are exactly alike, children generally go through the same stages of development. Knowing these stages can help you encourage your child to use media in new and creative ways.

3 year old boy

Your 3 year old says…

  • I can tell simple stories.

    What you can do: Ask your child specific questions about what’s on TV, on the computer screen and in books. As your child speaks, you might add information to help him learn new vocabulary. For example, if your child says “dog,” you can say, “yes, the large, furry dog.”

  • I like hearing and seeing the same story over and over again.

    What you can do: Ask your child questions about TV shows, videos and software games — even if they are favorites that he’s seen a dozen times. Though you may have memorized a story, your child may still be learning it.

  • I like to sing simple songs and can carry a tune.

    What you can do: Choose TV programs and computer activities that include songs and rhythms. Encourage your child to sing and dance rather than just watch. Don’t be afraid to sing and dance together.

  • I can name and match basic colors, like red, blue, yellow and green. I am starting to learn shapes.

    What you can do: Ask your child questions while he’s watching TV and playing on the computer. For example, point to the screen and ask: “What is that number?” “Does that door look like a rectangle or a circle?” “Do you know what color her shoes are?”

  • I like to ask who, what and why questions.

    What you can do: While watching TV shows, playing with software or visiting Web sites, explain to your child why certain events happen, who characters are and why they do the things they do.

  • I am interested in things that are the same and things that are different.

    What you can do: Point out when a TV character or animal does something physical that your child can do too — like hopping, jumping, going down a slide or walking like a monkey. Then do the motion together.

  • I want to move my body in new ways.

    What you can do: Choose TV programs and computer activities that include songs and rhythms. Encourage your child to sing and dance rather than just watch. Don’t be afraid to sing and dance together.

  • I enjoy helping out around the house and doing easy chores.

    What you can do: If you make a habit of covering the TV set or closing the doors to a cabinet where the computer is stored, encourage your child to be a part of that ritual.

  • I know whether I am a boy or a girl. I am learning what boys and girls are supposed to wear and what they are supposed to do.

    What you can do: Avoid TV shows with gender stereotypes that teach your child that an activity is “just for boys” or “just for girls.” Tell your child that both girls and boys can be anything they want to be and give specific examples.

  • I like to hear stories that are about me.

    What you can do: If you have made home videos or have a scrapbook or pictures of your child, look at them with him and talk about what happened the day you took the pictures.

  • I spend a lot of time watching what’s going on around me.

    What you can do: Turn TV watching into an activity. Ask your child questions about what he sees and hears.

  • If I am around people who seem different from me, I may become curious and ask questions.

    What you can do: Choose TV shows, books and software that expose your child to people of different backgrounds. Talk to him about what makes a culture unique and special.

15
Jan

Helping Your Child Make Successful Transitions: Home to School

Throughout childhood, children face changes at home and at school. These changes can be small and go unnoticed, or they can be life-changing. Beginning preschool or kindergarten is a transition that holds many changes for children. The importance of parents’ involvement in their child’s transition from home to school cannot be stressed enough. With the support of a caring parent, this transition can be a positive experience for a child, giving him or her a sense of self-confidence and accomplishment.

Tips for Helping Your Child Transition from Home to School

  • Give your child opportunities to leave you and spend time fun times with other adults and children.
  • Talk about school in positive ways.
  • Give your child opportunities to play with items like scissors, crayons, pencils, markers, paint and paper.
  • Read books to your child and talk about the pictures and the story.
  • Encourage your child’s independence by letting him follow simple directions and by letting him do tasks on his own.
  • Take your child to visit the school. Playing on the playground, touring the building, and finding the bathrooms are helpful activities at this time.
  • Ask your child what she thinks school will be like. You may learn that your child understands what to expect, or you may find that she has unrealistic fears or misunderstandings. Listen and talk about school.
  • Visit the bus stop or walk the route to school.
  • Expect your child’s transition to be successful. Remember the adjustment will take time.
  • Your positive outlook can help your child; let him know you are confident in his ability to do well.